Tom Kane's Blog

A word can change a mind. A sentence can change a life. A book can change the world

image broken brexit egg

There have been more votes in the British Parliament to do with Brexit than any of us can keep up with, and yet we are still uncertain as to what exactly, if anything, will happen on 29th March 2019. Brexit, it seems, is on a cliff edge and indeed it may happen sooner, or more likely it will happen later. It could be that it doesn’t happen at all and Britain becomes a wraith like entity always on the edge of being a part of the EU, but never being invited to the party. Nobody knows.

One thing though is certain, Brexit has come about in part due to many, many, older people voting to return Britain to a time when the UK was in charge of its own destiny. When Britain mattered as a force in its own right and didn’t need to pander to any ‘foreign Johnnies’ as my Granddad used to call people across the Channel.

I somehow think that many of my fellow Brits have rose coloured lenses in their spectacles. It may have been a glorious time of self determination when Britain stood alone at the start of World War 2, a time of Churchill and the famous ‘we will fight them on the beaches’  speech. But the modern world works in a very different way.

I’m not old enough to remember World War 2, I was born ten years after hostilities ended, and missed rationing by a few years too. But my parents both lived through it, indeed were to a greater and lesser extent involved in the struggle. My mother worked in a factory making radio sets for the armed forces and my father was a front-line tank commander who served in North Africa and Italy, eventually heading an army group working with the SOE to capture high ranking Nazis in Austria after full blown hostilities had ended in the European theatre of operations.

Both parents sustained injuries due to their war efforts which was a constant and permanent reminder of the struggle against the Nazis and their Axis allies.

What has this to do with Brexit? Bear with me.

For a long time Britain struggled at the outbreak of World War 2 to get itself onto a war footing. It’s armed forces were woefully unprepared, except maybe the Royal Navy, and the fight was a hard test for all, civilians included. It was a time of great uncertainty for nobody knew what the outcome would be. What made matters worse that for a long time after the fall of France in in June 1940, Britain stood virtually alone except for soldiers, sailors and airman of the British Empire and those who escaped occupied Europe, and a handful of American pilots in the Eagle Squadron. It was a time of great fear among the civilian population, indeed many thought Britain would succumb to the Nazi onslaught. But in the end, and after America joined the war in December 1941, the tide turned in the Allies favour and eventually victory was assured. But the cost was high. People died and were injured on an enormous scale and on top of that there was the monetary cost of the war. In fact Britain didn’t pay its war date off to America & Canada for loans made during the war until 2006. The payments of $83.25m (£42.5m) to the US and US$22.7m (£11.6m) to Canada were paid on the final day of business 2006.

Again you are probably asking what all this has to do with Brexit.

Two things you can take from the struggle of World War 2. The first is that Britain has a long history of ‘going it alone’ and getting on with the job in hand. Britain has always had a ‘can do’ attitude. The second is that Britain has always tried to do the right thing in paying its debts. Yes, there have been instances of disagreements with other countries on the hows and whys and whens of paying back what was owed. And for many years, probably even more so now, Britain has often been described as Perfidious Albion, particularly by the French. We Brits have a special love-hate relationship with France.

But at the end of the day, whatever happens with Brexit, and it looks more and more likely there will be a no deal Brexit, Britain will ‘get on’ with the job in hand and make a success of whatever history and circumstances throws at us. The British do not to sit back and throw their hands in the air and loudly gnash their teeth, they will quietly make the best of whatever deal (or no deal) comes before Brexit.

Despite the fact I live in Europe and voted for staying in the EU, I don’t worry if there is a no-deal. Such a scenario will offer the UK a fresh start and a clean slate. After all, before Britain joined the European Union, what was then called the Common market, it had trading partners all over the world. I remember it being quite a sad day when Britain’s trade as a stand alone nation was halted and replaced by trade deals negotiated by the EU. Our long time trading partners in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, to name but a few, were no doubt slightly miffed as we turned to the Common market.

Having said all that, trading practices have changed since the UK joined the EU in the 1970s. When I was a boy, Anchor Butter from New Zealand was the best butter around. Over the years it seemed to be replaced on supermarket shelves by Lurpak, a Danish brand. But that’s actually untrue and is only the way I perceived much cherished brands being usurped by foreign goods. In fact In the UK, Anchor butter was still imported from New Zealand up until August 2012 when UK licensee Arla Foods transferred production to a factory in Wiltshire, using British cream. So Anchor butter in Britain is no longer New Zealand butter, it’s British butter. Maybe I too have rose coloured spectacles on.

So what does all this mean to Britain if and when the politicians get their act together and make a decision. I predict after the UK leaves the EU prices on many goods will go up and we may well see a resurgence of brands such as Anchor with lower prices than equivalent EU brands. But over the coming months and years life will settle down again and we can all look forward to a time of peace and calm… except that is when French farmers and fishermen go on the rampage and block British goods arriving at French ports. As I said, life will return to normal.

C’est la Vie.

Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

 

image of the Brittle Sea Book One cover

The Brittle Sea will be published in three parts, Book One, Two and Three and these will constitute the completion of The Brittle Sea. Once these three parts are published and if there is enough interest I will then publish The Brittle Land followed by the completion of the trilogy, The Brittle Air. The trilogy will take the storytelling from the sinking of the Titanic to the end of World War 2.

The Brittle Sea – Book One is currently standing at 90 pages in length fully completed and edited and should be around 140 pages on completion and publication. Books Two and Three will be of a similar length and the final and full version,The Brittle Sea Omnibus, will be close to 450 pages in length.

Proof reading commences soon, and that’s going to be nerve wracking as the initial proof reader is my wife – never one to shirk from calling me out on shoddy writing and simple mistakes.

After the proof reading is another edit and then a final proof read. I would prefer another proof reader other than my wife so will be looking around to see who out in the real world would like to fulfill this role. If you have experience or would like to offer your services let me know by using the Contact form and type Proof Reading into the subject line. I’m always grateful for any help offered and if accepted I can send a free copy of the finished book as a gift.

More information coming soon and more on the actual publication date as we get closer to that time.

Tom Kane © 2019

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

Download my FREE books on iPhone

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

 

 

 

image of the night sky

The stars in the night sky in Cyprus are something to behold. If you’re on holiday in Cyprus in the spring or summer (or any time if you can stand cold nights) then put your glass down, take your shades off and move away from the bright lights and look up. It’s the stuff of dreams, music and poetry all rolled into one. Especially later in the Summer, around August time, when you can see the Milky Way and even the odd shooting star or two, you may even see the Perseid meteor shower which reaches its height around the 13th August this year.

Of course, as with any clear night, you may see a few odd, unexplained things. Rest assured most odd sightings are usually something benign, like a satellite moving slowly and silently across the night sky. I’ve seen numerous satellites and even the occasional drone, most likely from a US Navy carrier group somewhere in the Med, taking a look at nearby Syria. I’ve even seen a flying dog, which isn’t something you see every day, but you need to read the book A Pat on his Back to see what this was. But sometimes, just occasionally, you may see something that is way beyond odd and which cannot be explained away. Of these multiple sightings I’ve had, I think the weirdest thing was what I thought was a star suddenly fly away. It was very early one morning about five years ago, dawn was nowhere near breaking and my two springers, Harvey and Holly, wanted a toilet break so Harvey did his barky thing to wake me up… he still does. Anyway, out we went and looking in the direction of where dawn would eventually make its presence known, I could see what looked like a bright star low in the sky. After a while I realised it wasn’t a star, because it wasn’t twinkling. Stars twinkle when you look at them through the Earth’s atmosphere. If it’s not twinkling then it may be a planet, like Venus. So, as I watched I wondered which planet it was and made a mental note to look it up on the internet. It was at that point the planet moved. It went across the sky quite quickly, stopped and then shot up getting smaller and smaller as it did so. It was so quick from a standing start to moving that it took me a while to realise I had just seen something leaving Earth’s atmosphere, very quickly. There was no noise, no vapour trail from a rocket and no navigation lights, nothing to indicate it was anything but a planet low in our sky. Clearly, in order to move that fast, it couldn’t have been a planet. Don’t ask me what it was, I have no idea, but it certainly wasn’t something I’ve seen before, or since.

Twilight zone, here I come.

Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

 

image sweet alyssum

Sweet alyssum?

I consider myself to be a writer first, t-shirt designer second, computer programmer third and a complete amateur at gardening. But I’m learning, especially about writing and gardening.

For many years I was a computer programmer, happily skipping from contract to contract in Britain and Europe. That came to a crashing end when I was diagnosed with diabetes. Lifestyle. It will knock the stuffing out of you if you abuse your body.

So, I settled down and for over a decade I’ve been designing t-shirts and writing & publishing my books as an indie author. More recently I’ve taken up gardening, but I can’t say I’m any kind of expert, though I haven’t killed an awful lot of plants, yet. I do greatly admire those who can give you a plant’s Latin name as soon as they see it. Me? I’m still trying to master the English names.

So here we are with a plant I’ve managed to grow for successive years from seed and I have no idea what it’s called. It’s a pretty little thing, as you can from the top image. It’s flowers can be blue or white, depending in what seeds I use (that being luck more than judgement) and I know it smells like a hyacinth, but isn’t a hyacinth. So what is it? Well, I’ve finally got round to doing a bit of research and have come to the conclusion that it’s sweet alyssum. No, I’m not certain of this but from what I can tell it’s a pretty close call, so that’s what I’m going to call it.

Apart from the sweet alyssum I know what everything else is thanks to my numbering system.

image seedlings

And eventually this new concrete garden will be less bare

and more full of colour than the previous one. The front of the house, above, isn’t so bad, but the rear

image rear of house

needs a lot more colour. To say it’s a bit bare is an understatement. But I’m getting there.

image rear of house2

Copyright Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

image travel post Brexit

Today is the 6th of March 2019. Today there are only 23 days before Britain leaves the EU. Today the British government is still trying to arrange a divorce agreement between Britain and the European Union that will suit both sides. Anyone experiencing a civil divorce between a married couple will realise divorces are more often messy than amicable. There is absolutely no doubt that many, if not most, people in Britain, find they are becoming more concerned, confused and worried as the Brexit clock ticks down to its inevitable conclusion.

Today we could be seeing the beginning of a bright new future for Britain, or we could be seeing a nightmare unfolding.

Take the motor car industry in the UK. British cars designed, built and sold by exclusively British companies have long since disappeared from British and the roads around the world. Even those iconic brands that remain, like Jaguar, Range Rover and Rolls-Royce are no longer British owned. The rot set in during the 1970s and British car manufacturing is now mainly of foreign owned brands.

But the UK car manufacturing industry picked itself up and gained a lot of investment from several major foreign car manufacturers, and new car making facilities were built in the UK a number of years ago. Among these were Toyota and Nissan. Since that time of unprecedented investment in the UK, investment has dropped like a stone. This was not helped by the 2016 referendum that decided Britain was to leave the EU.

Now take a look at these recent BBC headlines:-

Car investment slumps as uncertainty bites
Brexit worries ‘add to car insurance costs’
Toyota and BMW warn no-deal Brexit could hit UK investment
Car investment halves as industry hits ‘red alert’
Ford warns no-deal Brexit would be ‘catastrophic’
Nissan says new X-Trail will be made in Japan, not UK
Porsche warns UK customers of Brexit price rise

That last headline is telling, because what we are now seeing is not only low investment, we are seeing some manufacturers saying they may close their plants in the UK and build abroad, i.e., in the EU. That will mean UK car prices will rise. Car imports into the UK will mean inevitable price rises. And that will mean price rises are probably inevitable across the board on all aspects of British commerce. Some price rises may be justified and some may be unscrupulous businesses ‘jumping on the bandwagon’ to make a quick profit.

Whatever the outcome of the current ‘last minute’ UK/EU negotiations, one thing is certain and inevitable, prices will rise and the UK consumers will have to pay that price.

Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

 

image little girl in a flood

Aristotle is said to have made this remark. “One swallow does not a summer make, nor one fine day; similarly one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy.”

Being happy is relative to the individual, but I’ve seen two swallows today and the sun is currently shining, so I’m pretty happy that spring and summer are almost here.

image Swallows

Having said that the dark clouds are rolling in again and it’s about to rain once more, and that’s in the space of typing one sentence! This has to be the wettest winter I have experienced in over ten years living in Cyprus. Now here’s a thought, would you be happy if your normal spring, summer, autumn and winter cycle didn’t happen this year? And how happy would you be if that normal cycle never happened again?

If my current experience of what’s happening in Cyprus, with longer and hotter summers and wetter winters is down to global warming then the only good thing is that wetter winters mean we may not experience another drought in Cyprus. But that can only mean some disastrous weather elsewhere in the world. One man’s good fortune is another man’s disaster.

With floods ever on the increase, and even Cyprus has had its fair share, the weather patterns are obviously shifting and we can no longer look forward to the sort of normal(ish) weather we used to experience. The frightening thing is, nobody actually knows what the world’s weather will be like in ten, twenty or fifty years time. The weather could become stable and not be too disrupted if we get a handle on global warming now and put a halt to it. But what happens if governments, like Trump’s America, ignore the obvious and carry on as normal? One thing is for certain, we are in for a roller-coaster ride of one weather related disaster after another at any time, anywhere, in the world.

Welcome to an uncertain future.

Copyright Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

image Greek salad

Like a lot of people who live in Cyprus, I love to eat a good Greek salad in the summer. What most visitors to Cyprus, who tuck into those tasty salads, will probably never know is that the common lettuce we eat in salads has a long and noble history. Being the nosey individual I am, I looked into the history books and found some interesting facts on the lettuce, something that we normally take for granted. I discovered that the humble, crunchy, lettuce we love to eat had connections to where I live and one of my favourite subjects, Cyprus and Space.

Lettuce has its origins in the Middle East and appears on wall murals in Egypt from about 2700 B.C. The Greeks learned how to grow lettuce from the Egyptians and Greek mythology depicts Aphrodite’s lover, Adonis, killed in a bed of lettuce by a boar, apparently an arranged assassination by a jealous diety. Aphrodite, of course, was born in Cyprus, which is why Cyprus is sometimes referred to as the Island of love.

Eventually the Romans took on the lettuce and it was called lactuca. Over time, and thanks to the Roman conquest of Britain, lactuca made its way into the British diet and became lettuce in English.

Now the lettuce has joined the space race. From humble beginnings around 5,000 years ago, the lettuce and its relatives have now moved on from its lowly roots (pun intended) and the lettuce Outedgeous has become the first lettuce to be grown from seed, harvested and eaten in space.

I’m sowing the same seeds for the the lettuce Outredgeous today, in my tiny greenhouse, and hopefully by May I should have some lovely red, sweet and crunchy, romaine lettuce for salads.

Here’s to the space race and the eventual cultivation of lettuce on Mars. Now that would be something to write home about.

Copyright Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

image Myristica fragrans

Anyone who has read any of my posts on gardening, probably realise that though I’m all for nice and neat rows of flowers that make a great display and attract butterflies and bees, I also like to grow things that are a little bit out there, plants that are not normal to a suburban garden.

Take for example the OutREDgeous Space Lettuce or the Hungarian Apple Melon. Maybe you fancy a nibble on a Psidium Guave or a little Apple Paprika in your Goulash and all the while admiring the colours in the Latana Camara.

image of Latana Camara

Latana Camara

These are some of the plants I’m hoping to grow from seed, but the one I think is going to be a real test to grow is the Myristica fragrans, or Nutmeg as most call it.

The seeds are the source of the spice nutmeg. These are powdered and usually added to sweet dishes like sauces, custard, puddings and cakes. The dried flesh surrounding the seed (that’s the red bit in the top picture) is the source of the spice mace which can be used to flavour savoury dishes such as soups, sauces, curries, pork pies (one day I’ll make my own pork pies) and pickles. The flesh of the fruit is also edible and can be cut in slices and eaten as a delicacy with sambal, which is a chili sauce or paste.

All in all quite a useful tree and normally grown in the tropics. It was Marco Polo who introduced nutmeg to the Europeans which is now commercially grown in the Caribbean, in particular the spice island of Grenada. Having visited Grenada once in my travels, I can certainly attest to the heady smell of nutmeg in the markets there.
Nutmeg is used in India to increase sexual stamina and the Chinese used it to cure diarrhea – not sure if there’s a connection between sex and pooh! Some herbalists recommend it for digestive disorders and vomiting, and has been used in treating palpitations caused by stress. Many in the west were introduce to nutmeg as an essential ingredient of rice pudding. But beware, high doses of nutmeg can be toxic and hallucinogenic and was once used by prisoners in jail to relieve boredom, sometimes leading to an untimely death.
Well, we shall see if I can manage to grow this from seed, though I don’t expect it to flower or produce fruit for a number of years, if at all. It may seem a bit pointless as I may well be dead by the time it flourishes. Well, that’s exactly the point, it’s the challenge that matters and if I succeed in simply growing the plant from scratch, I’ll be happy.

Copyright Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

image of a daisy

No, I’m not referring to a property number on an address like Rockefeller Plaza or an asteroid in the Oort Cloud or any place else for that matter. I’m referring to a little stone I’ve just discovered and named.

No, I’m not bonkers yet, but I am working on it each and every day. Here’s the little rock in question.

image of a small rock

This is all to do with my attempt at cataloging my planted seeds as described in my previous post on the subject of gardening by numbers.You see I can mark up all my seed trays and tubs with numbers, but you can’t do the same with soil unless you want a garden full of little plastic strips that break up over time and cause a lot of damage to the environment. So, Rock 15 will be ‘planted’ alongside seeds or plants so that I can look up on my list exactly what it is I planted there. Of course, as it stands, Rock 15 will be joined by a number (no pun intended) of other little numbered rocks scattered throughout my garden.

You see, gardening isn’t a boring pastime for old folk. Gardening Rocks!

Copyright Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

image of pansies

When I was a kid, Painting by Numbers was all the rage for a couple of years and although I was a bit messy, it did teach me the value of using numbers… if not how to paint. Numbers in my career as a computer programmer have obviously played an important role, but as an amateur gardener, numbers are once more proving useful. Keeping track of what’s planted where, for example.

Like my wife who enjoys knitting and buying lots of wool (enough to sink a battleship) I like buying seeds (enough to sink a canoe) and obviously planting them.

image of a daisy

The thrill of watching new life break through the surface and mature into a plant is pretty awesome. But until now, I’ve had a tendency to write on a stick what I’ve planted in a pot and shove that in the soil. Herein lies my problem. This year has been exceptionally wet and damp, so even with permanent markers the name on the wooden sticks I use has run. I’ve tried photocopying and laminating the seed packet but that too has run. So, the solution? A number on the side of the seed trays and all my tubs. Join this up with a database and my programming skills and voila, I have a pretty good cataloging system.

image of garlic

Garlic

Only one slight problem, how do I mark out the same information onto a plant in a garden? Because I now have borders in this new property we’ve moved into, I have to find a method to ensure I know what it is I’ve planted. Wooden sticks in the ground are not an option, nor are laminated seed packets.

image of herbs

Coriander, Parsley and Oregano.

How to know what the name of each plant in the borders, that’s my WIP (Work In Progress) in my garden this year.

Copyright Tom Kane © 2019

As a English expat author living in Cyprus, you may think my life revolves around cocktails by the pool. You would be wrong. In ten years on the island I’ve had my fair share of adventures and interesting experiences.

Read a free sample of A Pat on his Back – Only £1.99 on Amazon Kindle.

Living in Cyprus: 2018  is out now, packed full of photographs and over 230 pages in length. This book is three books in one with details of my recent trip to Australia and Italy’s Lake Como. This new release is three times bigger than any of the previous five volumes, 2013 to 2017 and at only £3.99 on Amazon Kindle is still a bargain price.

Download my FREE Books on Amazon Kindle

Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here

 

Download my FREE books on iPhone
Living in Cyprus: 2015 here

Hitler’s Secret Atomic Bomb here

An Indie Author Quick Guide to Blogging here